faculty
Research Profiles
David M. Barnett

David M.
Barnett

Mark L. Brongersma

Mark L.
Brongersma

Bruce M. Clemens

Bruce M.
Clemens

Yi Cui

Yi
Cui

Reinhold H. Dauskardt

Reinhold H.
Dauskardt

Sarah Heilshorn

Sarah
Heilshorn

Robert Huggins

Robert
Huggins

Aaron Lindenberg

Aaron
Lindenberg

Michael D. McGehee

Michael D.
McGehee

Paul C. McIntyre

Paul C.
McIntyre

Nicholas A. Melosh

Nicholas A.
Melosh

William D. Nix

William D.
Nix

Friedrich B. Prinz

Friedrich B.
Prinz

Alberto Salleo

Alberto
Salleo B.

Robert Sinclair

Robert
Sinclair

Shan X. Wang

Shan X.
Wang

recentProfiles

David M. Barnett

Research Statement

Dislocations in Elastic Solids; Bulk, Surface and Interfacial Waves in Anisotropic Elastic Media; Mechanics of Piezoelectric and Piezomagnetic Materials, Modeling of transport in fuel cell materials and of AFM usage to characterize charge distributions and impedance of fuel cell media.

He is the author of over 100 technical articles concerned with dislocations and waves in anisotropic elastic media.

Mark L. Brongersma

Research Statement

Brongersma's research focuses on the fabrication and characterization of nanometer-size electronic and optical devices. The ability to engineer materials at the atomic level has opened myriad possibilities for the advancement of technologies that impact the areas of semiconductors, telecommunications, chemistry, and pharmaceuticals. His current research is aimed at the development of Si-based microphotonic functionality and plasmonic devices that can manipulate the flow of light at the nanoscale.

Research Interests
Nanoscale electronic and photonic materials and devices.
Guiding and manipulation of light in metal-optic structures.
Optical properties of semiconductor nanocrystals and nanowires.
Fundamentals of ion beam modification of materials.
Nanoscale thermal engineering with light.

Bruce M. Clemens

Research Statement

Clemens studies the growth, structure, magnetic properties, and mechanical properties of thin films and nanostructured materials. By controlling growth and atomic scale structure, he is able to tune and optimize properties. He is currently investigating materials for metallization, magnetic recording, electronic device, and hydrogen storage applications.

Yi Cui

Research Statement

Cui studies nanoscale phenomena and their applications broadly defined. Research Interests:

Nanocrystal and nanowire synthesis and self-assembly.
Electron transfer and transport in nanomaterials and at the nanointerface.
Nanoscale electronic and photonic devices, batteries, solar cells, microbial fuel cells, water filters and chemical and biological sensors.

Reinhold H. Dauskardt

Research Statement

Dauskardt and his group have worked extensively on integrating new materials into emerging technologies including thin-film structures for nanoscience and energy technologies, high-performance composite and laminates for aerospace, and on biomaterials and soft tissues in bioengineering. His group has pioneered methods for characterizing adhesion and cohesion of thin films used extensively in device technologies. His research on wound healing has concentrated on establishing a biomechanics framework to quantify the mechanical stresses and biologic responses in healing wounds and define how the mechanical environment affects scar formation. Experimental studies are complimented with a range of multiscale computational capabilities. His research includes interaction with researchers nationally and internationally in academia, industry, and clinical practice.

Sarah Heilshorn

Research Statement

Heilshorn's interests include biomaterials in regenerative medicine, engineered proteins with novel assembly properties, microfluidics and photolithography of proteins, and synthesis of materials to influence stem cell differentiation. Current projects include creating in vitro circuits of neurons, tissue engineering for spinal cord regeneration, and designing scaffolds for cell transplantation in the treatment of Parkinson's disease and stroke.

Research Interests:

Biomaterials in regenerative medicine
Engineered proteins with novel assembly properties
Microfluidics and photolithography of proteins
Tissue engineering for spinal cord regeneration
Synthesis of materials to influence stem cell differentiation

Robert Huggins

Research Statement

His research activities have included studies of imperfections in crystals, solid-state reaction kinetics, ferromagnetism, mechanical behavior of solids, crystal growth, and a wide variety of topics in physical metallurgy, ceramics, solid state chemistry and electrochemistry. Primary attention has recently been focused on the development of understanding of solid state ionic phenomena involving solid electrolytes and mixed ionic-electronic conducting materials containing atomic or ionic species such as lithium, sodium or oxygen with unusually high mobility, as well as their use in novel battery and fuel cell systems, electrochromic optical devices, sensors, and in enhanced heterogeneous catalysis. He was also involved in the development of the understanding of the key role played by the phase composition and oxygen stoichiometry in determining the properties of high temperature oxide superconductors.

Topics of particular recent interest have been related to energy conversion and storage, including hydrogen transport and hydride formation in metals, alloys and intermetallic compounds, and various aspects of materials and phenomena related to advanced lithium batteries.

Aaron Lindenberg

Research Statement

Lindenberg's research is focused on probing the ultrafast dynamics and atomic-scale structure of materials on femtosecond and picosecond time-scales. X-ray techniques are combined with ultrafast laser techniques to provide a new way of taking snapshots of materials in motion. Current research is focused on the dynamics of phase transitions, ultrafast properties of nanoscale materials, photoelectrochemical charge transfer dynamics, and THz nonlinear spectroscopy.

Michael D. McGehee

Research Statement

McGehee's research group studies organic semiconductors, nanostructured materials and solar cells.

Paul C. McIntyre

Research Statement

McIntyre's research group investigates the kinetics and mechanisms of diffusion, chemical reactions, and phase transitions that occur during materials processing and service. Most of this work focuses on thin films, with particular emphasis on complex metal oxides for advanced electronic applications. His students synthesize materials, characterize their structures and electrical properties, and develop predictive models for important time-dependent phenomena. Their current research interests include atomic layer deposition of ultrathin films onto complex surfaces (e.g. semiconductor nanowires), area-selective deposition of nanometer-scale device structures, and interface atomic and electronic structure studies.

Nicholas A. Melosh

Research Statement

Melosh's research is focused on developing methods to detect and control chemical processes on the nanoscale, to create materials that are responsive to their local environment. The research goal incorporates many of the hallmarks of biological adaptability, based on feedback control between cellular receptors and protein expression. Similar artificial networks may be achieved by fabricating arrays of nanoscale (<100 nm) devices that can detect and influence their local surroundings through ionic potential, temperature, mechanical motion, capacitance, or electrochemistry. These devices are particularly suited as 'smart' biomaterials, where multiple surface-cell interactions must be monitored and adjusted simultaneously for optimal cell adhesion and growth. Other interests include precise control over self-assembled materials, and potential methods to monitor the diagnostics of complicated chemical systems, such as the effect of drug treatments within patients.

Research Interests:
Molecular materials at interfaces
Directed dynamic self-assembly
Controlling molecular or biomolecular assembly and behavior
Influence of local electronic, optical or thermal stimuli.

William D. Nix

Research Statement

I have been engaged in the study of mechanical properties of materials for more than 40 years. My early work was on high temperature creep and fracture of metals, focusing on techniques for measuring internal back stresses in deforming metals and featuring the modeling of diffusional deformation and cavity growth processes. My students and I also studied high temperature dispersion strengthening mechanisms and described the effects of threshold stresses on these creep processes. Since the mid-1980's we have focused most of our attention on the mechanical properties of thin film materials used in microprocessors and related devices. We have developed many of the techniques that are now used to study of thin film mechanical properties, including nanoindentation, substrate curvature methods, bulge testing methods and the mechanical testing of micromachined (MEMS) structures. We are also known for our work on the mechanisms of strain relaxation in heteroepitaxial thin films and plastic deformation of thin metal films on substrates. In addition we have engaged in research on the growth, characterization and modeling of thin film microstructures, especially as they relate to the development of intrinsic stresses. Our current work deals with the mechanical properties of nanostructures and with strain gradients and size effects on the mechanical properties of crystalline materials.

Friedrich B. Prinz

Research Statement

Fritz Prinz serves on the faculties of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering. He also holds the Finmeccanica Professorship in the School of Engineering. He obtained his Ph.D. in Physics at the University of Vienna, Austria. Prof. Prinz's current work focuses on scaling effects and quantum confinement phenomena for energy conversion. His graduate students study mass transport phenomena across thin membranes such as oxide films and lipid bi-layers. In their research, the Prinz group employs Scanning Probe Microscopy, Impedance Spectroscopy, and Quantum Modeling. In his laboratory, prototype fuel cells, solar cells, and batteries serve to test new concepts and novel material structures.

Alberto Salleo

Research Statement

Novel materials and processing techniques for large-area and flexible electronic/photonic devices. Ultra-fast laser processing for electronics, photonics and biotechnology. Defects and structure/property studies of polymeric semiconductors, nano-structured and amorphous materials in thin films.

Robert Sinclair

Research Statement

Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, Sinclair studies microelectronic and magnetic thin film microstructure.

Shan X. Wang

Research Statement

Wang is engaged in the research of magnetic nanotechnology, biosensors, spintronics, integrated inductors and information storage. He uses modern thin-film growth techniques and lithography to engineer new electromagnetic materials and devices and to study their behavior at nanoscale and at very high frequencies. His group is investigating magnetic nanoparticles, high saturation soft magnetic materials, giant magnetoresistance spin valves, magnetic tunnel junctions, and spin electronic materials, with applications in cancer nanotechnology, in vitro diagnostics, rapid radiation triage, spin-based information processing, efficient energy conversion and storage, and extremely high-density magnetic recording.

Research Interests:
Magnetic nanotechnology including bio-magnetic sensors, cancer nanotechnology, in vitro diagnostics, radiation triage, DNA forensics
Magnetic inductive heads, RF magnetic inductors, and soft magnetic materials
Magnetoresistive materials and spin electronics
Magnetic recording physics and information storage

Associate Professor Juan G. Santiago

Thermosciences Group

Graduate student Daniel Strickland shows Professor Juan G. Santiago the modifications he has implemented into a hydrogen fuel cell experiment. The group is developing and optimizing methods for removal of product water from fuel cells; they aim to develop more robust, higher performance power systems.  More »