faculty

Research Centers and Facilities


The headquarters of the Materials Science and Engineering Department is in the William F. Durand Bldg (Building 04-540). This building also houses equipment for optical, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, metallography, wet chemistry, mechanical testing of bulk and thin film materials, UHV sputter deposition, electrical and magnetic measurements, vacuum annealing treatments and metal forming.

 

McCulloughThe Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials (GLAM) is an interdisciplinary laboratory used by researchers from Materials Science and Engineering, Applied Physics, Physics,Chemistry, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering. GLAM is located in two connected buildings, the McCullough Building and the Moore Building. GLAM has office and lab space for approximately 25 professors and their research groups. It also houses several labs that are maintained by GLAM staff and made available for the entire Stanford materials research community.

These labs contain a scanning probe microscope, a scanning electron microscope, a transmission electron microscope, an electron microprobe, a focused ion beam, an x-ray photoelectron spectrometer and several x-ray diffractometers.

  Top of pageMoore

Center for Advanced Molecular Photovoltaics CAMP, is a research center led by Profs. Michael McGehee and Peter Peumans with the goal of revolutionizing the global energy landscape by developing the science and technology for stable, efficient molecular photovoltaic cells that can compete with fossil fuels in cost per kilowatt-hour produced. CAMP is funded starting June 2008 by a 5-year $25M grant from King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) Global Research Partnership program. CAMP’s activities will span polymer, small molecular and dye-sensitized molecular solar cells with research activities in molecular design through advanced quantum mechanical calculations, molecular synthesis, nanostructure engineering and characterization, understanding and engineering carrier recombination, light management, transparent contacts, third generation cell concepts, and the engineering of durable molecular solar cells.

  Top of page

Bio-X is an interdisciplinary program that facilitates research and teaching in the areas of bioengineering, biomedicine and biosciences. It operates across three Schools -- Humanities and Sciences, School of Engineering and School of Medicine.

  Top of page

The Center for Integrated Systems(CIS) contains the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility (SNF), which has one of the best and most versatile clean rooms for micro and nanofabrication in the country. It also has an affiliates program with a variety of semiconductor technology companies that provides an opportunity for interactions between Stanford and industry.

  Top of page

The Center for Polymer Interfaces and Macromolecular Assemblies (CPIMA) is an NSF-funded Materials Research Science and Engineering Center that was renewed in 2002 for six more years. This center enables collaborations between researchers at Stanford, IBM Almaden, UC Berkeley and UC Davis. Its laboratories contain the equipment needed to synthesize, process and characterize organic materials.

  Top of page

PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science represents a partnership between the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, and the Department of Energy with mission to carry out cutting-edge research in ultrafast science.  PULSE research is focused on ultrafast structural and electronic dynamics in materials science, the generation of laser pulses lasting only attoseconds (quintillionths of a second), imaging of single molecules and non-periodic materials, and the study of ultrafast light-induced chemical reactions.

  Top of page

Rapid Prototyping Laboratory (RPL) creates and models micro and nanoscale devices to understand the physics of energy conversion in fuel cells and photovoltaic systems. 

  Top of page

The Stanford Photonics Research Center (SPRC) builds strategic partnerships between the Stanford University research community and companies employing optics and photonics in their commercial activities.

  Top of page

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is a national research facility supported by the U.S. Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for research in science, medicine, and engineering. Students from several departments, including Materials Science and Engineering, use the SSRL facilities extensively. A variety of materials-related research, making use of the high flux, brightness, and variable energy of the synchrotron beam, is carried out at SSRL.

  Top of page

The Stanford Center for Magnetic Nanotechnology is organized on the successful foundation of the Center for Research on Information Storage Materials (founded in 1991). The mission of the Center is to stimulate research at Stanford in the areas of magnetic nanotechnology, magnetic sensing, and information storage materials, to facilitate collaboration between Stanford scientists and their industrial colleagues, to train well-rounded and highly skilled graduate students, and to develop curricular offerings in the relevant subjects.

  Top of page

Other departments conducting materials research

  Top of page