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The Chemistry of Quantum Materials

Leslie M. Schoop

Department of Chemistry - Princeton University

Event Details:

Wednesday, May 22, 2024
11:30am - 12:30pm PDT

Location

Stanford University
350 Jane Stanford Way Stanford
Packard 101
Stanford, CA 94305
United States

This event is open to:

Alumni/Friends
Faculty/Staff
General Public
Students

Abstract: Quantum materials are hoped to change technology in various aspects. However, most of the desired applications are hindered by the lack of suitable materials. In my group we are using concepts from chemistry to understand, predict and synthesize new quantum materials. In this talk, I will show how simple concepts, such as measuring bond distances, allow us to make predictions about electronic structures of materials, which we can then use to find new topological materials. We then can combine this with structural building blocks containing magnetic elements to design materials with non-collinear or even non-coplanar magnetism. Thinking about the degree of delocalization in a chemical bond can be helpful to find Kagome or linear-chain materials with band structures that better resemble simple tight binding models. I will give a general overview of how powerful chemical concepts are in materials discovery and highlight a flute of materials that were discovered in this light.

Bio: Dr. Schoop received her Diploma in Chemistry from Johannes Gutenberg University (2010) and PhD in Chemistry from Princeton University (2015). She then went on to work as a Minerva fast-track fellow under Professor Bettina Lotsch at the Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research (2015-2017). Dr. Schoop joined the Princeton University Department of Chemistry Faculty in 2017 and was tenured in 2022. In 2019 she won the Beckman Young Investigator Award and became a Moore foundation EPiQS Materials Synthesis Investigator. In 2020 she was awarded the Packard fellowship for science and engineering and in 2021 the Sloan fellowship in Chemistry and the DOD Office of Naval Research Young Investigator award. In 2022 she was awarded the NSF CAREER award. The Schoop Lab is working at the interface of chemistry and physics, using chemical principles to find new materials with exotic physical properties.

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